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Chronographing ML long guns
#1
Hello everyone. There's a strong following for the black arts  of ML at the Derby shooting club (DRPC1999 - MLA affiliated Of Course!) and we need some recommendation on a decent quality Chronograph to measure projectile speed from ML long guns.  Give us some advice too on how far in front of the muzzle the Chrono can be safely placed without getting wrecked. We have heard that 7 feet is an OK clearance for this?  Can we get closer or is this too close already - give us your minimum distance plse. The actual  make of the best Chronos would be very useful. Thanks Jeff R
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#2
I used the F1 Shooting Chrony to diagnose my patch shredding Baker and it worked well on a camera tripod.

With drinking straws in place of the hoops it did ML shotguns as well.

I got the version with the display on a wire so I could put an iron plate in front of the workings, just in case. Wouldn't have preserved it from the Baker but good to stop a few #8's.

The hoops are only required under a Texan blue sky. You will need to be a few feet back and make sure no smoke lingers in the hoops or it will see the bang as a shockwave before the ball arrives.
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#3
(17-02-2018, 10:50 AM)Robin_G_Hewitt Wrote: I used the F1 Shooting Chrony to diagnose my patch shredding Baker and it worked well on a camera tripod.

With drinking straws in place of the hoops it did ML shotguns as well.

I got the version with the display on a wire so I could put an iron plate in front of the workings, just in case. Wouldn't have preserved it from the Baker but good to stop a few #8's.

The hoops are only required under a Texan blue sky. You will need to be a few feet back and make sure no smoke lingers in the hoops or it will see the bang as a shockwave before the ball arrives.

Robin, thanks for the detail here. It's interesting that the kit can get distracted by the smoke and ingore the projectile! I'm very concerned by the other bits exiting ML, longguns, in particular, damaging the Chronograph. I'm looking at the radar rigs like Labradar. That can sit to the side of the muzzle. Have you heard anything about that one - except that it's expensive of course!! Jeff R
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#4
All the optical chronoscopes can be fooled by smoke. However a muzzle loading gun does not push out residue from the previous shot ahead of the projectile, so no need to stand so far back. I have heard very little feedback on the radar jobbies, so either totally brill' or totally unaffordable. Not having to put anything ahead of the firing line is good, but how would it cope with a wad?
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#5
Robin.There is some general forum comment out there saying that it solves the problem of stuff coming out of ML longguns as it can be put 15 inches to side of the muzzle instead of 7 to 15 feet in front of the muzzle which is where , they say, you need to place a standard chronograph to avoid it being damaged from the wad etc. Perhaps it just picks up the metal object ( don't know if that's true because I just made it up!) Bw Jeff R
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#6
I have used the Labrador with a single shot percussion pistol and it worked well.
The wad shouldn’t be an issue as the start is triggered by a microphone.

Sorry,
Spell checker leapt in, Labradar not labrador.
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