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Hunting with black pwder muzzle loaders
#21
Gunsports: Which size ball do you use in your Martini?  I own a MkIV that I've had for 35 years and I've never fired it.  When I bought it the seller also sold me a box of Kynock rounds, and I've never been able to bring myself to shoot one.  They are paper patched.

How do you load the cartridge case?  Do you just pour in powder and push in the ball?  I think I'd use an over powder wad and shoot FF.
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#22
Loading Martinis is a complex subject. Best advice is to look at http://www.britishmilitariaforums.yuku.com where you can spend several hours reading up on the subject.
Fred
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#23
Dead 1: No, I shoot an Enfield 3 band muzzle loading rifle (amongst others). This one has a 1:78 rifling twist; why I do not know. It is more accurate with ball than with a Minie bullet. Charge is 90gr (rifle grain) of our local BP substitute: Sannadex; a dextrose based powder.

I have friends who now resurrect their Martini's and I've helped them develop loads for their rifles (And I get to play with them!). Here, we mainly use lathe turned cases; straight bored inside. Some use nitro cellulose powders; I prefer to use our local substitute. 90gr of the pistol grain, a lubricated 1.8mm card wad and a 410gr (carbine) bullet seems to give the same flight path as the original loadings; at least insofar as the sight settings goes.

With 'proper' cases from the UK, we are struggling a little bit, mainly due to the powder we use over here. (BP is very scarce and obscenely expensive.) But, we will prevail.

When we get loads that work, I'll advise.
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#24
All Enfield 'three banders' have a 1/78 twist. That was the established pattern for the Minié Pattern 1851 and the Enfield Pattern 1853 and goes right on to the end of the Long Snider.
Short Rifles were initially 1/78 but were changed to 1/48 with five grooves with the 1858 Naval Rifle and the later Army Short Rifles.
W. S. (Bill) Curtis
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#25
Quote:Gunsport
Here in the UK we shoot game we do not hunt , to hunt was with horse and hounds which is now illegal. All of my game shooting which is mostly driven birds such as pheasant , partridge and grouse is with a sxs percussion muzzle loader or a black powder hammer gun. Any of these types of gun be it a muzzle loader or a black powder hammer gun  in the hands of a good shot can shoot  shot for shot as much game as a modern breech loader something that has been proven many times.
Feltwad

What!!! It's illegal to hunt foxes with the horses and hounds?  I watched them do it in 1975!  What a shame!  ILLEGAL!  You guys should revolt.
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#26
Quote:Dead 1: No, I shoot an Enfield 3 band muzzle loading rifle (amongst others). This one has a 1:78 rifling twist; why I do not know. It is more accurate with ball than with a Minie bullet. Charge is 90gr (rifle grain) of our local BP substitute: Sannadex; a dextrose based powder.

I have friends who now resurrect their Martini's and I've helped them develop loads for their rifles (And I get to play with them!). Here, we mainly use lathe turned cases; straight bored inside. Some use nitro cellulose powders; I prefer to use our local substitute. 90gr of the pistol grain, a lubricated 1.8mm card wad and a 410gr (carbine) bullet seems to give the same flight path as the original loadings; at least insofar as the sight settings goes.

With 'proper' cases from the UK, we are struggling a little bit, mainly due to the powder we use over here. (BP is very scarce and obscenely expensive.) But, we will prevail.

When we get loads that work, I'll advise.

Well, all I can say is that the British built an empire on their "stiff upper lip", but you guys need help with gun sports and shooting. Least that's my take on it.  I'd rather shoot black powder guns than eat.  That does not,  however; apply to drinking.

I'm looking forward to shooting a round ball in my Snider.  I actually have one case.  I need to buy some more. Here's why I'm not shooting now.  This just now outside my study window. [Image: LifeinBendandRiver001.jpg]
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#27
Rather like here in North Wales, lying snow and the air temperature currently 20 degs F.  This is  very unusual for us as we do not normally get this until January or February if then.  This man made global warming scam is pure rubbish designed to extract money from the gullible tax payer.  We  get what we get and what drives it is the sun which is going through a very quiet stage at the present. Off the coast from us is a huge windfarm which is producing zero elecricity when the weather is coldest as there is no wind.  The cost of these things is huge and we are the mugs that pay for them.  We do not even get the benefits of employing the men who make them as they are made overseas. All MAD.
W. S. (Bill) Curtis
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#28
I recall the snows in London in the late 50's.  It's always a magical time when it snows.  I just love it.  Of course now that I'm retired, I don't have to drive or work in the stuff.  I just sit in front of the fireplace and watch it as it builds up.  I am required to shovel it from the sidewalk along the front and sides of my home.  That's okay...I use a gas powered thingy to get it done.

I sure wish I could gather with a bunch of you gents around a coal fire in a pub somewhere and discuss old muzzle loading guns.  First round is on me!
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#29
Dead1
A coal fire that is now a thing of the past not many about gas and oil have taken over, they are getting fewer every year just like a top grade muzzle loader
Feltwad
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#30
And the horrible choking smogs they produced are now virtually gone.  We still get fogs (though very rarely here on the North Wales coast) but at least they are not a dirty yellow now.
W. S. (Bill) Curtis
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